American Religious History

Myths America Lives by: White Supremacy and the Stories That Give Us Meaning (2nd ed.)

Myths America Lives by: White Supremacy and the Stories That Give Us Meaning (2nd ed.)
$20.00
Six myths lie at the heart of the American experience. Taken as aspirational, four of those myths remind us of our noblest ideals, challenging us to realize our nation's promise while galvanizing the sense of hope and unity we need to reach our goals. Misused, these myths allow for illusions of innocence that fly in the face of white supremacy, the primal American myth that stands at the heart of all the others.
ISBN/SKU: 
9780252083754
Publication Date: 
2018-09-05
0

Nation of Nations: A Great American Immigration Story

Nation of Nations: A Great American Immigration Story
$17.00
"An incisive look at immigration, assimilation, and national identity" (Kirkus Reviews) and the landmark immigration law that transformed the face of the nation more than fifty years ago, as told through the stories of immigrant families in one suburban county in Virginia.

In the years since the 1965 Immigration and Nationality Act, the foreign-born population of the United States has tripled. Americans today are vastly more diverse than ever. They look different, speak different languages, practice different religions, eat different foods, and enjoy different cultures.

In 1950, Fairfax County, Virginia, was ninety percent white, ten percent African-American, with a little more than one hundred families who were "other." Currently the Anglo white population is less than fifty percent, and there are families of Asian, African, Middle Eastern, and Latin American origin living all over the county. "In A Nation of Nations, National Public Radio correspondent Tom Gjelten brings these changes to life" (The Wall Street Journal), following a few immigrants to Fairfax County over recent decades as they gradually "Americanize." Hailing from Korea, Bolivia, and Libya, the families included illustrate common immigrant themes: friction between minorities, economic competition and entrepreneurship, and racial and cultural stereotyping.

It's been half a century since the Immigration and Nationality Act changed the landscape of America, and no book has assessed the impact or importance of this law as A Nation of Nations. With these "powerful human stories...Gjelten has produced a compelling and informative account of the impact of the 1965 reforms, one that is indispensable reading at a time when anti-immigrant demagoguery has again found its way onto the main stage of political discourse" (The Washington Post).

ISBN/SKU: 
9781476743868
Publication Date: 
2016-10-25
0
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NATIVE AMERICAN THEOLOGY

NATIVE AMERICAN THEOLOGY
$26.00
The first effort to articulate a comprehensive Native American theology. "Grounded in Native American experiences, here is a theology that lays a firm foundation for Indian national sovereignty and cultural integrity. Native Americans are the original people in this hemisphere. A Native American Theology is a creative and critical crafting of an original God-talk and God-walk. As a trickster voice, this stellar book uses traditional categories of systematic theology only to subvert them with an Indian imagination of hope." -Dwight N. Hopkins, University of Chicago Divinity School.. This collaborative work represents a pathbreaking exercise in Native American theology. While observing traditional categories of Christian systematic theology (Creation, Deity, Christology, etc.), each of these is reimagined consistent with Native experience, values, and worldview. At the same time the authors introduce new categories from Native thought-worlds, such as the Trickster (eraser of boundaries, symbol of ambiguity), and Land. Finally, the authors address issues facing Native Americans today, including racism, poverty, stereotyping, cultural appropriation, and religious freedom. Clara Sue Kidwell is professor of Native American studies at the University of Oklahoma. Homer Noley recently retired from his position as director of the National United Methodist Native American Center at the School of Theology at Claremont and is author of The First White Frost. George E. "Tink" Tinker is professor of American Indian Cultures and Religious Traditions at Iliff School of Theology, and the author of Missionary Conquest.
ISBN/SKU: 
9781570753619
Publication Date: 
2001-05-23
0
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Publisher: 

Native Religions of North America: The Power of Visions and Fertility

$20.00
ISBN/SKU: 
9780881339857
Publication Date: 
1997-12-01
0
Author: 
Publisher: 

New American Judaism: How Jews Practice Their Religion Today

New American Judaism: How Jews Practice Their Religion Today
$30.00

A leading expert provides an engaging firsthand portrait of American Judaism today

American Judaism has been buffeted by massive social upheavals in recent decades. Like other religions in the United States, it has witnessed a decline in the number of participants over the past forty years, and many who remain active struggle to reconcile their hallowed traditions with new perspectives--from feminism and the LGBTQ movement to "do-it-yourself religion" and personally defined spirituality. Taking a fresh look at American Judaism today, Jack Wertheimer, a leading authority on the subject, sets out to discover how Jews of various orientations practice their religion in this radically altered landscape. Which observances still resonate, and which ones have been given new meaning? What options are available for seekers or those dissatisfied with conventional forms of Judaism? And how are synagogues responding?

Wertheimer provides new and often-surprising answers to these questions by drawing on a wide range of sources, including survey data, visits to countless synagogues, and revealing interviews with more than two hundred rabbis and other informed observers. He finds that the majority of American Jews still identify with their faith but often practice it on their own terms. Meanwhile, gender barriers are loosening within religiously traditional communities, while some of the most progressive sectors are reappropriating long-discarded practices. Other recent developments include "start-ups" led by charismatic young rabbis, the explosive growth of Orthodox "outreach," and unconventional worship experiences often geared toward millennials.

Wertheimer captures the remarkable, if at times jarring, tableaux on display when American Jews practice their religion, while also revealing possibilities for significant renewal in American Judaism. What emerges is a quintessentially American story of rash disruption and creative reinvention, religious illiteracy and dynamic experimentation.

ISBN/SKU: 
9780691181295
Publication Date: 
2018-08-28
0

New England Theology: From Jonathan Edwards to Edwards Amasa Park

New England Theology: From Jonathan Edwards to Edwards Amasa Park
$37.00
""This volume of rare sermons and documents makes an unprecedented contribution to our understanding of the 'New England Theology' as it emerged from Jonathan Edwards and continued through Edwards Amasa Park. The introduction, prepared by two seasoned Edwards scholars, represents an acute and thought-provoking analysis of the intellectual and rheological underpinnings of the New England Theology. A rich, absorbing, and always engaging collection, this volume will be of great interest to Edwards scholars and general readers alike."" --Harry S. Stout, Yale University ""One of the problems in studying American theology in the eighteenth and nineteenth century is that many of the sources are not easily available. The New England Theology is a marvelous anthology of central writings. Aficionados may quibble because some valuable material was left out, but this is a great collection. The introductions and editorial work of the editors are also helpful and fair minded."" --Bruce Kucklick, University of Pennsylvania ""This volume, collecting the major representative writings of the American disciples of Jonathan Edwards, is the first of its kind and long overdue. In the hands of Sweeney and Guelzo, the 'New Divinity' movement emerges here as a grand story, told in the medium of theology that both reflected and shaped the new republic."" --Kenneth P. Minkema, Yale University ""Although both historians and the general public have become increasingly fascinated by Jonathan Edwards, many know little about the thinkers who tried to carry on his legacy. Douglas Sweeney and Allen Guelzo should be commended for assembling a marvelous collection of writings."" --Catherine A. Brekus, University of Chicago Divinity School ""In these judicious selections accompanied by crisp and illuminating introductions, Sweeney and Guelzo ably identify the vitality and scope of the New England Theology. If you want to know something of the flavor and substance of America's first indigenous theology, this volume is the place to begin."" --David W. Kling, University of Miami ""This collection of the New England Theology's primary texts clearly reveals both the continuing presence of Edwardsean thought and the diversity of its expression in the century following Jonathan Edwards's death."" --Ava Chamberlain, Wright State University Douglas A. Sweeney (PhD, Vanderbilt University) is Associate Professor and Chair of the Church History and the History of Christian Thought department and Director of the Center for Theological Understanding at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School. Allen C. Guelzo (PhD, University of Pennsylvania) is the Henry R. Luce Professor of the Civil War Era and Director of the Civil War Era Studies program at Gettysburg College.
ISBN/SKU: 
9781498220934
Publication Date: 
2015-05-13
0
Author: 
Publisher: 

Not Quite Not White: Losing and Finding Race in America

Not Quite Not White: Losing and Finding Race in America
$16.00
Winner of the ALA Asian/Pacific American Award for Nonfiction

"Captivating... [a] heartfelt account of how newcomers carve a space for themselves in the melting pot of America."


--Publishers Weekly

A first-generation immigrant's "intimate, passionate look at race in America" (Viet Thanh Nguyen), an American's journey into the heart of not-whiteness.

At the age of 12, Sharmila Sen emigrated from India to the U.S. The year was 1982, and everywhere she turned, she was asked to self-report her race - on INS forms, at the doctor's office, in middle school. Never identifying with a race in the India of her childhood, she rejects her new "not quite" designation - not quite white, not quite black, not quite Asian -- and spends much of her life attempting to blend into American whiteness. But after her teen years trying to assimilate--watching shows like General Hospital and The Jeffersons, dancing to Duran Duran and Prince, and perfecting the art of Jell-O no-bake desserts--she is forced to reckon with the hard questions: What does it mean to be white, why does whiteness retain the magic cloak of invisibility while other colors are made hypervisible, and how much does whiteness figure into Americanness?

Part memoir, part manifesto, Not Quite Not White is a searing appraisal of race and a path forward for the next not quite not white generation --a witty and sharply honest story of discovering that not-whiteness can be the very thing that makes us American.

ISBN/SKU: 
9780143131380
Publication Date: 
2018-08-28
0
Author: 
Publisher: 

Object and Apparition: Envisioning the Christian Divine in the Colonial Andes (3rd ed.)

Object and Apparition: Envisioning the Christian Divine in the Colonial Andes (3rd ed.)
$30.00
When Christianity was imposed on Native peoples in the Andes, visual images played a fundamental role, yet few scholars have written about this significant aspect. Object and Apparition proposes that Christianity took root in the region only when both Spanish colonizers and native Andeans actively envisioned the principal deities of the new religion in two- and three-dimensional forms. The book explores principal works of art involved in this process, outlines early strategies for envisioning the Christian divine, and examines later, more effective approaches.

Maya Stanfield-Mazzi demonstrates that among images of the divine there was constant interplay between concrete material objects and ephemeral visions or apparitions. Three-dimensional works of art, specifically large-scale statues of Christ and the Virgin Mary, were key to envisioning the Christian divine, the author contends. She presents in-depth analysis of three surviving statues: the Virgins of Pomata and Copacabana (Lake Titicaca region) and Christ of the Earthquakes from Cusco.

Two-dimensional painted images of those statues emerged later. Such paintings depicted the miracle-working potential of specific statues and thus helped to spread the statues' fame and attract devotees. "Statue paintings" that depict the statues enshrined on their altars also served the purpose of presenting images of local Andean divinities to believers outside church settings.

Stanfield-Mazzi describes the unique features of Andean Catholicism while illustrating its connections to both Spanish and Andean cultural traditions. Based on thorough archival research combined with stunning visual analysis, Object and Apparition analyzes the range of artworks that gave visual form to Christianity in the Andes and ultimately caused the new religion to flourish.

ISBN/SKU: 
9780816534234
Publication Date: 
2016-08-23
0

Objects of Devotion: Religion in Early America

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$30.00
Objects of Devotion: Religion in Early America tells the story of religion in the United States through the material culture of diverse spiritual pursuits in the nation's colonial period and the early republic. The beautiful, full-color companion volume to a Smithsonian National Museum of American History exhibition, the book explores the wide range of religious traditions vying for adherents, acceptance, and a prominent place in the public square from the 1630s to the 1840s. The original thirteen states were home to approximately three thousand churches and more than a dozen Christian denominations, including Anglicans, Baptists, Catholics, Congregationalists, Lutherans, Methodists, Presbyterians, and Quakers. A variety of other faiths also could be found, including Judaism, Islam, traditional African practices, and Native American beliefs. As a result, America became known throughout the world as a place where, in theory, if not always in practice, all are free to believe and worship as they choose. The featured objects include an 1814 Revere and Sons church bell from Salem, the Jefferson Bible, wampum beads, a 1654 Torah scroll brought to the New World, the only known religious text written by an enslaved African Muslim, and other revelatory artifacts. Together these treasures illustrate how religious ideas have shaped the country and how the treatment and practice of religion have changed over time. Objects of Devotion emphasizes how religion can be understood through the objects, both rare and everyday, around which Americans of every generation have organized their communities and built this nation.
ISBN/SKU: 
9781588345929
Publication Date: 
2017-05-23
0
Author: 
Publisher: 

Our Country: Its Possible Future and its Present Crisis

Our Country: Its Possible Future and its Present Crisis
$27.00
This is a pre-1923 historical reproduction that was curated for quality. Quality assurance was conducted on each of these books in an attempt to remove books with imperfections introduced by the digitization process. Though we have made best efforts - the books may have occasional errors that do not impede the reading experience. We believe this work is culturally important and have elected to bring the book back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide.
ISBN/SKU: 
9780554653877
Publication Date: 
2008-08-14
0
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Patterns in the Sky : An Introduction to Ethnoastronomy (2nd ed.)

$19.00
ISBN/SKU: 
9781577661818
Publication Date: 
2001-03-19
0

People Called Quakers

People Called Quakers
$17.00
A broad portrait of a way of life and a way of thought which is a live option for vital, contemporary Christians. D. Elton Trueblood, author of more than 30 books, depicts the Quaker experiment in radical Christianity. His portrayal of early Quakers and their lives is vital background for the impact that Quakers have had on society for more than three hundred years.
ISBN/SKU: 
9780913408025
Publication Date: 
2016-11-01
0
Author: 
Publisher: 

PEOPLE ON THE WAY

PEOPLE ON THE WAY
$18.00
Shares the experiences of Asian North American Christians as they claim their identity and are shaped by their rich Asian religious and cultural heritage.
ISBN/SKU: 
9780817012427
Publication Date: 
2005-12-03
0
Publisher: 

PIONEER HEALERS

PIONEER HEALERS
$24.50
Book by Stepsis, Ursula
ISBN/SKU: 
9780824508944
Publication Date: 
1997-12-01
0

Pure: Inside the Evangelical Movement That Shamed a Generation of Young Women and How I Broke Free

Pure: Inside the Evangelical Movement That Shamed a Generation of Young Women and How I Broke Free
$17.00
In Pure, Linda Kay Klein uses a potent combination of journalism, cultural commentary, and memoir to take us "inside religious purity culture as only one who grew up in it can" (Gloria Steinem) and reveals the devastating effects evangelical Christianity's views on female sexuality has had on a generation of young women.

In the 1990s, a "purity industry" emerged out of the white evangelical Christian culture. Purity rings, purity pledges, and purity balls came with a dangerous message: girls are potential sexual "stumbling blocks" for boys and men, and any expression of a girl's sexuality could reflect the corruption of her character. This message traumatized many girls--resulting in anxiety, fear, and experiences that mimicked the symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder--and trapped them in a cycle of shame.

This is the sex education Linda Kay Klein grew up with.

Fearing being marked a Jezebel, Klein broke up with her high school boyfriend because she thought God told her to and took pregnancy tests despite being a virgin, terrified that any sexual activity would be punished with an out-of-wedlock pregnancy. When the youth pastor of her church was convicted of sexual enticement of a twelve-year-old girl, Klein began to question purity-based sexual ethics. She contacted young women she knew, asking if they were coping with the same shame-induced issues she was. These intimate conversations developed into a twelve-year quest that took her across the country and into the lives of women raised in similar religious communities--a journey that facilitated her own healing and led her to churches that are seeking a new way to reconcile sexuality and spirituality.

Pure is "a revelation... Part memoir and part journalism, Pure is a horrendous, granular, relentless, emotionally true account (The Cut) of society's larger subjugation of women and the role the purity industry played in maintaining it. Offering a prevailing message of resounding hope and encouragement, "Pure emboldens us to escape toxic misogyny and experience a fresh breath of freedom" (Glennon Doyle, #1 New York Times bestselling author of Love Warrior and founder of Together Rising).

ISBN/SKU: 
9781501124822
Publication Date: 
2019-07-02
0
Author: 
Publisher: 

Race and Religion Among the Chosen People of Crown Heights

Race and Religion Among the Chosen People of Crown Heights
$31.00

In August of 1991, the Brooklyn neighborhood of Crown Heights was engulfed in violence following the deaths of Gavin Cato and Yankel Rosenbaum--a West Indian boy struck by a car in the motorcade of a Hasidic spiritual leader and an orthodox Jew stabbed by a Black teenager. The ensuing unrest thrust the tensions between the Lubavitch Hasidic community and their Afro-Caribbean and African American neighbors into the media spotlight, spurring local and national debates on diversity and multiculturalism. Crown Heights became a symbol of racial and religious division. Yet few have paused to examine the nature of Black-Jewish difference in Crown Heights, or to question the flawed assumptions about race and religion that shape the politics--and perceptions--of conflict in the community.

In Race and Religion among the Chosen Peoples of Crown Heights, Henry Goldschmidt explores the everyday realities of difference in Crown Heights. Drawing on two years of fieldwork and interviews, he argues that identity formation is particularly complex in Crown Heights because the neighborhood's communities envision the conflict in remarkably diverse ways. Lubavitch Hasidic Jews tend to describe it as a religious difference between Jews and Gentiles, while their Afro-Caribbean and African American neighbors usually define it as a racial difference between Blacks and Whites. These tangled definitions are further complicated by government agencies who address the issue as a matter of culture, and by the Lubavitch Hasidic belief--a belief shared with a surprising number of their neighbors--that they are a "chosen people" whose identity transcends the constraints of the social world.

The efforts of the Lub­avitch Hasidic community to live as a divinely chosen people in a diverse Brooklyn neighbor­hood where collective identi­ties are generally defined in terms of race illuminate the limits of American multiculturalism--a concept that claims to celebrate diversity, yet only accommodates variations of certain kinds. Taking the history of conflict in Crown Heights as an invitation to reimagine our shared social world, Goldschmidt interrogates the boundaries of race and religion and works to create space in American society for radical forms of cultural difference.

ISBN/SKU: 
9780813538976
Publication Date: 
2006-09-01
0

Race and the Making of the Mormon People

Race and the Making of the Mormon People
$33.00
The nineteenth-century history of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Max Perry Mueller argues, illuminates the role that religion played in forming the notion of three original American races--red, black, and white--for Mormons and others in the early American Republic. Recovering the voices of a handful of black and Native American Mormons who resolutely wrote themselves into the Mormon archive, Mueller threads together historical experience and Mormon scriptural interpretations. He finds that the Book of Mormon is key to understanding how early followers reflected but also departed from antebellum conceptions of race as biblically and biologically predetermined. Mormon theology and policy both challenged and reaffirmed the essentialist nature of the racialized American experience.

The Book of Mormon presented its believers with a radical worldview, proclaiming that all schisms within the human family were anathematic to God's design. That said, church founders were not racial egalitarians. They promoted whiteness as an aspirational racial identity that nonwhites could achieve through conversion to Mormonism. Mueller also shows how, on a broader level, scripture and history may become mutually constituted. For the Mormons, that process shaped a religious movement in perpetual tension between its racialist and universalist impulses during an era before the concept of race was secularized.



ISBN/SKU: 
9781469636160
Publication Date: 
2017-09-11
0

Racial Reckoning: Prosecuting America's Civil Rights Murders

Racial Reckoning: Prosecuting America's Civil Rights Murders
$20.00

Few whites who violently resisted the civil rights struggle were charged with crimes in the 1950s and 1960s. But the tide of a long-deferred justice began to change in 1994, when a Mississippi jury convicted Byron De La Beckwith for the 1963 murder of Medgar Evers. Since then, more than one hundred murder cases have been reopened, resulting in more than a dozen trials. But how much did these public trials contribute to a public reckoning with America's racist past? Racial Reckoning investigates that question, along with the political pressures and cultural forces that compelled the legal system to revisit these decades-old crimes.

" A] timely and significant work...Romano brilliantly demystifies the false binary of villainous white men like Beckwith or Edgar Ray Killen who represent vestiges of a violent racial past with a more enlightened color-blind society...Considering the current partisan and racial divide over the prosecution of police shootings of unarmed black men, this book is a must-read for historians, legal analysts, and journalists interested in understanding the larger meanings of civil rights or racially explosive trials in America."
--Chanelle Rose, American Historical Review

ISBN/SKU: 
9780674976030
Publication Date: 
2017-05-08
0
Author: 

Railroading Religion Mormons, Tourists, and the Corporate

Railroading Religion Mormons, Tourists, and the Corporate
$30.00
Railroads, tourism, and government bureaucracy combined to create modern religion in the American West, argues David Walker in this innovative study of Mormonism's ascendency in the railroad era. The center of his story is Corinne, Utah--an end-of-the-track, hell-on-wheels railroad town founded by anti-Mormon businessmen. In the disputes over this town's frontier survival, Walker discovers intense efforts by a variety of theological, political, and economic interest groups to challenge or secure Mormonism's standing in the West. Though Corinne's founders hoped to leverage industrial capital to overthrow Mormon theocracy, the town became the site of a very different dream.

Economic and political victory in the West required the production of knowledge about different religious groups settling in its lands. As ordinary Americans advanced their own theories about Mormondom, they contributed to the rise of religion itself as a category of popular and scholarly imagination. At the same time, new and advantageous railroad-related alliances catalyzed LDS Church officials to build increasingly dynamic religious institutions. Through scrupulous research and wide-ranging theoretical engagement, Walker shows that western railroads did not eradicate or diminish Mormon power. To the contrary, railroad promoters helped establish Mormonism as a normative American religion.



ISBN/SKU: 
1469653206
Publication Date: 
2019-09-30
0

RE-FORMING THE CENTER: AMERICAN PROTESTA NTISM 1900 TO THE PRESENT

RE-FORMING THE CENTER: AMERICAN PROTESTA NTISM 1900 TO THE PRESENT
$28.00
This insightful book explores the structure and identity of American Protestantism in the twentieth century. The standard picture of these years portrays Protestantism as divided into two diametrically opposed camps -- fundamentalist/evangelical Protestantism and liberal/mainline Protestantism. The contributors to this volume -- Martin E. Marty, Richard Hughes, and twenty-one others -- challenge this two-party thesis, questioning such a division both on the basis of empirical validity and on the basis of contemporary usefulness. They show that the two-party model not only provides an inadequate map of American Protestantism during the past century but also distorts Protestant hopes for the future.
ISBN/SKU: 
9780802842985
Publication Date: 
1998-07-01
0

Reconstructing the Gospel: Finding Freedom from Slaveholder Religion

Reconstructing the Gospel: Finding Freedom from Slaveholder Religion
$20.00
  • 2018 Foreword INDIES Book of the Year Award Finalists - Multicultural
  • "I am a man torn in two. And the gospel I inherited is divided." Jonathan Wilson-Hartgrove grew up in the Bible Belt in the American South as a faithful church-going Christian. But he gradually came to realize that the gospel his Christianity proclaimed was not good news for everybody. The same Christianity that sang, "Amazing grace, how sweet the sound" also perpetuated racial injustice and white supremacy in the name of Jesus. His Christianity, he discovered, was the religion of the slaveholder. Just as Reconstruction after the Civil War worked to repair a desperately broken society, our compromised Christianity requires a spiritual reconstruction that undoes the injustices of the past. Wilson-Hartgrove traces his journey from the religion of the slaveholder to the Christianity of Christ. Reconstructing the gospel requires facing the pain of the past and present, from racial blindness to systemic abuses of power. Grappling seriously with troubling history and theology, Wilson-Hartgrove recovers the subversiveness of the gospel that sustained the church through centuries of slavery and oppression, from the civil rights era to the Black Lives Matter movement and beyond. When the gospel is reconstructed, freedom rings for both individuals and society as a whole. Discover how Jesus continues to save us from ourselves and each other, to repair the breach and heal our land.
    ISBN/SKU: 
    9780830845347
    Publication Date: 
    2018-03-13
    0
    Publisher: 

    Red Brethren: The Brothertown and Stockbridge Indians and the Problem of Race in Early America

    Red Brethren: The Brothertown and Stockbridge Indians and the Problem of Race in Early America
    $25.00

    New England Indians created the multitribal Brothertown and Stockbridge communities during the eighteenth century with the intent of using Christianity and civilized reforms to cope with white expansion. In Red Brethren, David J. Silverman considers the stories of these communities and argues that Indians in early America were racial thinkers in their own right and that indigenous people rallied together as Indians not only in the context of violent resistance but also in campaigns to adjust peacefully to white dominion. All too often, the Indians discovered that their many concessions to white demands earned them no relief.

    In the era of the American Revolution, the pressure of white settlements forced the Brothertowns and Stockbridges from New England to Oneida country in upstate New York. During the early nineteenth century, whites forced these Indians from Oneida country, too, until they finally wound up in Wisconsin. Tired of moving, in the 1830s and 1840s, the Brothertowns and Stockbridges became some of the first Indians to accept U.S. citizenship, which they called becoming white, in the hope that this status would enable them to remain as Indians in Wisconsin. Even then, whites would not leave them alone.

    Red Brethren traces the evolution of Indian ideas about race under this relentless pressure. In the early seventeenth century, indigenous people did not conceive of themselves as Indian. They sharpened their sense of Indian identity as they realized that Christianity would not bridge their many differences with whites, and as they fought to keep blacks out of their communities. The stories of Brothertown and Stockbridge shed light on the dynamism of Indians' own racial history and the place of Indians in the racial history of early America.

    ISBN/SKU: 
    9781501700750
    Publication Date: 
    2015-10-29
    0

    RED-HOT & RIGHTEOUS: URBAN RELIGION OF T HE SALVATION ARMY

    RED-HOT & RIGHTEOUS: URBAN RELIGION OF T HE SALVATION ARMY
    $16.95

    In this engrossing study of religion, urban life, and commercial culture, Diane Winston shows how a (self-styled "red-hot") militant Protestant mission established a beachhead in the modern city. When The Salvation Army, a British evangelical movement, landed in New York in 1880, local citizens called its eye-catching advertisements "vulgar" and dubbed its brass bands, female preachers, and overheated services "sensationalist." Yet a little more than a century later, this ragtag missionary movement had evolved into the nation's largest charitable fund-raiser--the very exemplar of America's most cherished values of social service and religious commitment.

    Winston illustrates how the Army borrowed the forms and idioms of popular entertainments, commercial emporiums, and master marketers to deliver its message. In contrast to histories that relegate religion to the sidelines of urban society, her book shows that Salvationists were at the center of debates about social services for the urban poor, the changing position of women, and the evolution of a consumer culture. She also describes Salvationist influence on contemporary life--from the public's post-World War I (and ongoing) love affair with the doughnut to the Salvationist young woman's career as a Hollywood icon to the institutionalization of religious ideals into nonsectarian social programs.

    Winston's vivid account of a street savvy religious mission transformed over the decades makes adroit use of performance theory and material culture studies to create an evocative portrait of a beloved yet little understood religious movement. Her book provides striking evidence that, counter to conventional wisdom, religion was among the seminal social forces that shaped modern, urban America--and, in the process, found new expression for its own ideals.

    ISBN/SKU: 
    9780674003965
    Publication Date: 
    2000-10-02
    0
    Author: 

    Religion and Hopi Life in the 20th Century, 2nd ed

    Religion and Hopi Life in the 20th Century, 2nd ed
    $15.95

    Religion and Hopi Life tells the story of Hopi religious life in a way that makes sense to both Hopis and outsiders. In his interpretation of Hopi religion, John D. Loftin does not subject religious meaning to secular analysis. While not the Hopi's own story, his account attempts to honor and do justice to the way in which the Hopi embody religious meaning through the living of their lives. The second edition of this highly praised book keeps scholarly debates and theories to a minimum, except when they help illuminate the understanding of Hopi religious orientation and worldview. Several important studies of the Hopi have emerged since the book's first publication, and their findings have been incorporated. The book also includes new material on shamanism, death, witchcraft, myth, tricksters, and kachina initiations. This updated edition incorporates other minor corrections and additions to the text, and revises and expands the footnotes and the annotated bibliography.

    ISBN/SKU: 
    9780253215727
    Publication Date: 
    2003-05-08
    0
    Author: 

    Religion and Society in Fronteir California

    Religion and Society in Fronteir California
    $50.00
    The chaotic and reputedly immoral society of the California mining frontier during the gold rush period greatly worried Protestant evangelicals from the Northeast, and they soon sent missionaries westward to transplant their religious institutions, beliefs, and practices in the area. This book tells the story of that enterprise, showing how it developed, why it failed, and what patterns of religious adherence evolved in the West in place of evangelical Protestantism. Laurie Maffly-Kipp begins by analyzing the eastern-based religious ideology that underlay the movement westward, investigating the motives behind the founding of home mission boards dedicated to the spread of Christianity and civility among new settlers. Drawing on the diaries, letters, and journals of hundreds of California "argonauts, " Maffly-Kipp describes those missionaries and their wives sent to California after 1848 and the virtually all-male mining society that resisted the missionaries' notions of moral order and in turn created new religious beliefs and practices. Maffly-Kipp argues that despite its alleged immorality, the California gold rush was actually one of the most morally significant events of the nineteenth century, for it challenged and brought into conflict the cherished values of antebellum American culture: a commitment to spiritual and social progress; a concern with self-discipline, moral character, and proper gender roles; and a thirst for wealth fostered by the spirit of free enterprise.
    ISBN/SKU: 
    9780300053777
    Publication Date: 
    1994-01-28
    0
    203.432.6101